Chrysler 300 forum banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,850 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is my attempt at a how to for painting. Unfortunately I dont have any pics. I know what/how to paint, but am too impatient to do so.


TIP:
ambient temp need to be AT LEAST 50 degrees for paint to cure. optimum temp is around 70 - 80 degrees.

When painting Chomed Plastic (ie Trunk wing) it is wise to sand a little on the back when preping to prime. Then, when clearing such a part, clear around to the back where you sanded. What this does is wraps the clear around to the back, which in this case has 3m applied to it and is stuck to the car, which prevents the paint/clear from peeling due to wind/water because the seem is covered.


What to get:

If you can, paint with what the pros use. You can get aerasol cans that are premixed, these work fine, but be sure to get them from a reputable source.

If you want to use a paint gun w/air compressor, or a PREVAL can or something similar (this is an aerasol can that has a glass jar attached to it, and is good to use for small parts) you will need to go to an automotive paint supply store. You will need to get the paint for your car (be sure to bring in the paint code, located on the drivers door on the white sticker with the VIN), thinner/diluter (this will thin the paint to give a nice even spray), hardener (used to help the paint dry/harden quicker/better), and a clear coat.

Be sure to get etching primer (usually have in an aerasol can that is easy to use)

The guy at the paint counter will let you know in what ratios to mix everything (ie paint to hardener to thinner and clear to hardener to thinner)
Be sure to have him write it down for you so you dont forget.

Another quick tip, wait until all parts are painted before mixing clear. The mixed paint will stay in a watery form for a very long time, but once the clear is mixed, you have about 15 - 25 minutes to start using before it becomes to thick and clocks your paint gun.

Sandpaper. Get various grits, ranging from 280 to 2000.

A bucket for water.

Optional: (for Step six)
Car polish, any good polish that you would use to polish your car with to remove swirls. Ask your paint guy what he/she recommends or contact Kevin from Perfect Auto Finish or any detailer for recommendations on polish.

Step one:
Prep your parts. You will need to sand your parts so the primer will stick well, which in turn will make the paint stick better. For metal parts, use a lower grit paper, like a 280 or 320 grit. for plastic or fiberglass parts i would use between a 600 - 1000 grit. Once you have sanded your parts, use an air compressor or damp cloth to blow off/wipe down the part to remove any dust/debris. Rubbing alcohol works great for a wipe down because it evaporates quickly and leaves no moisture.

Step two:
Primer your parts.
Use the etching primer that you bought and apply a nice even coat to the parts. Do not make the coat to thick though, especially on smaller parts. This will cause you to lose any lines/contours/shapes of the parts. Allow the primer to set/dry. The can will tell you how long to wait.

This is a good time to mix your paint.

Step three:
Apply your base coat of paint.
This is an art that takes time to learn. Apply nice even, thin coats of paint in stripes across the piece. the trick is not to sweep your hand or the paint will be thicker on the outer edges. Walk with the paint gun if the part is large. If not, keep a steady distance and move your ARM from side to side. This will give you nice even layers of paint. If a part is small, just do one strip of paint. The larger the part, the more strips you do. DO NOT go over a strip that you have painted before. You will build this up too high.
Allow your paint to dry.

Step four:
This will really make your paint pop. Get a bucket of tepid water (luke warm). Now use 2000 grit sandpaper. Splash some water on the part. Now dip the sandpaper in the water and wet sand the painted areas. Make sure to keep the sandpaper and the area being sanded wet. Be sure to thouroughly wet sand each part. This will make the paint feel smooooooth and look great. Now dry the sanded areas. The paint will look dull and scuffed. THIS IS OK. Now repeat step three. If desired repeat step four again. The more you do this the better the parts will look, but you dont need to be excessive. 3-4 revolutions of this cycle will be perfect.

Now make sure to do this to all your parts before doing step five. Once you have wetsanded your painted parts for the final time, allow them to dry.

Step five:
Clear coat. Mix your clear coat now with the ratio given by the paint shop.

Begin clear coating all the parts for their first coat. If you run out of clear before finishing, its alright, you will just be a step behind on these parts. If you have extra clear, immediately pour into an empty milk jug, that way it will harden in there and not in the paint gun. Rinse your reseroir/glass bottle out with thinner so you sont have hard clear in there either.

After the first coat of clear, begin wetsanding all of the cleared parts. Use the same techinque and grit sandpaper as you did with the paint. The finish will look great and feel smooth. When you let the parts dry however, they will look dull and cloudy. THIS IS OK. This will go away with the next layer of clear.

After the wetsanded parts are dry, mix another batch of clear coat. Repeat this step. The more times you do this step, the "wetter" the finished product will look, which is what you want.

When you have applied your last coat of clear, you can stop if you wish, the parts will look very good.

If you want to make your parts POP, go to next step.

Step six:
Wetsand the final layer of clear coat. Use the polish that you bought. Apply the polish to the wet sanded clear coat and buff to a HIGH SHINE. If you already own a nice car buffer, you will want to use on this step.

This is that extra step that will make your parts look so deep, wet, and shiny that people will think a pro painted them. I promise, if you do these steps, and have patience, your parts will look Awesome!!!!!!!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
34,041 Posts
Great writeup bro! Although pics would have been nice, the step by step was very clear. Very good tips too! Thanks for sharing and adding a great addition to the knowledge base! Now that deserves rep points!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,850 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Great writeup bro! Although pics would have been nice, the step by step was very clear. Very good tips too! Thanks for sharing and adding a great addition to the knowledge base! Now that deserves rep points!
thanx, like I said, im too impatient to actually do it. so I dont have any pics to show.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,531 Posts
WOW Damien! You work quickly!
Great write-up, and so quickly done after the request... whattaguy :D

One comment on wet-sanding color coats: If the paint is metallic, you can "flash" the metallic if you sand too much. This is where the sandpaper grabs the metallic particles and removes/smears/cuts them so the metallic shimmer looks different in some places than in others.
I will only wet sand the clear coats after this happened to me a few times. Now I am paranoid and won't touch color coats.

Great work D's.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ds300C

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,850 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
WOW Damien! You work quickly!
Great write-up, and so quickly done after the request... whattaguy :D

One comment on wet-sanding color coats: If the paint is metallic, you can "flash" the metallic if you sand too much. This is where the sandpaper grabs the metallic particles and removes/smears/cuts them so the metallic shimmer looks different in some places than in others.
I will only wet sand the clear coats after this happened to me a few times. Now I am paranoid and won't touch color coats.

Great work D's.
Thanx Jay, coming from the king of How To's, that is really a compliment. Thanx for the added info about flashing. I havent had a problem with this so didnt know about it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,181 Posts
Nice work Devil Dog! I'm gonna put this to use as soon as this weekend maybe. I owe you a beer for getting this done and done so quickly and so well. :beerchug: Beans!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,436 Posts
The best thing I got from this entire thing was the right sandpaper which made all the difference. Plus I got some really good paint this time when I painted. Came out perfect this time. My thanks to D's and Tork for their help on my recent adventure.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,181 Posts
Yup... you gotta go more gritty on the prep work and more fine on the finishing. I'm just glad I have a garage now and I don't have to use my shower as a paint booth... talk about a pain in the ass. Did get me nice and high though, hahahaha.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
WOW Damien! You work quickly!
Great write-up, and so quickly done after the request... whattaguy :D

One comment on wet-sanding color coats: If the paint is metallic, you can "flash" the metallic if you sand too much. This is where the sandpaper grabs the metallic particles and removes/smears/cuts them so the metallic shimmer looks different in some places than in others.
I will only wet sand the clear coats after this happened to me a few times. Now I am paranoid and won't touch color coats.

Great work D's.
You're right, Jay. NEVER sand metallic paints, especially dark ones. If you put a light coat of color down, then you typically don't get a lot of orange peal. The clear is where you get the orange peal and needs to be wet sanded to remove it.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top