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Discussion Starter #1
I have some small paint chips that I would like to touch up. Most of them are on the front end from road stones.

I was thinking of trying http://drcolorchip.com/.

Anyone else use this product? Does it work as well as it sounds?

If anyone has had a really good experience with another product I would love to know what you used.

I have used a dealer supplied brush on type in past years that I recall that it went on pretty thick.

I would like to do this one right the first time.

Thanks in Advance.
 

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Never seen anything quite like that.

Most folks touch it up and then wetsand/clay bar/polish etc.

If it's really chipped up that bad it's gonna be pretty hard to get it back to being really pretty. That kit seems almost like it wants you to just smear it around somehow and it just blends together.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Never seen anything quite like that.

Most folks touch it up and then wetsand/clay bar/polish etc.

If it's really chipped up that bad it's gonna be pretty hard to get it back to being really pretty. That kit seems almost like it wants you to just smear it around somehow and it just blends together.
It is not really bad.. three or four are maybe the size of a matchstick head and a bunch much smaller ones that I am sure most wouldnt even notice but me.

I have never wet sanded before but since the chips are small I would imagine I would make it worse.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm sure some other folks will chime in, I've never had very good luck with touch ups.
Yea I haven't had much luck in the past either. I hope to hear some good suggestions and see how it turns out.

Thanks
 

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Here is some info that I have used...along with color sanding and PC & a mild polish to buff back to a shine if necessary...

Paint Chip Repair Made Easy
None of us can avoid those darn paint chips. They annoy us every time we wash our car when we see them. They also seem to grow in size and dimension every week.
Well, we can do something about it, short of a costly body shop visit. Here are some things you will need first: factory touchup paint, a pack of artist brushes (you can buy these at any craft store for under 5 bucks) a can of Acrylic Lacquer thinner, old rags, piece of cardboard, and a small container.
I tell people is to wash their car first. The reason for washing is that many times a blemish may be removed during the cleaning stage, thus you won't not need to touch it up.
Begin by taking some of the thinner and pour a small amount into a container. Shake your touch up paint well (most factory paint is thick).
Have your small piece of cardboard and an old rag next to you. Put about a dime size amount of paint on the cardboard, pick out a brush the correct size that will match the size of the chips you are working on.
The problem with the brush supplied with the paint is that it is large enough to paint your garage doors, NOT your chips. Always remember this, "less is best". You can avoid those unsightly "blobs" by using less paint.
Take your brush and put it in the thinner, dab dry. There will still be enough thinner in the brush to thin the paint. Apply the brush to the paint, moving it around. You will be thinning the paint just enough to make it easy to work with.
Now go to your chips and lightly touch them. *NOTE, the paint will dry fast on your brush; you might only get to one chip at first before the brush gets dried out and the paint gets stiff. Just simply start process over again, and move on to your next chip.
Once you get the hang of it, you might get 2-3 chips done before you need to thin again. After 24 hours, you have the option of putting a coat of clear on (nail polish works for this as well) which you can get at an auto supply store.
Some have told me that leaving it just with the paint works fine, without the clear. Try a hidden area with the clear first and see how it looks before you move on.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Here is some info that I have used...along with color sanding and PC & a mild polish to buff back to a shine if necessary...

Paint Chip Repair Made Easy
None of us can avoid those darn paint chips. They annoy us every time we wash our car when we see them. They also seem to grow in size and dimension every week.
Well, we can do something about it, short of a costly body shop visit. Here are some things you will need first: factory touchup paint, a pack of artist brushes (you can buy these at any craft store for under 5 bucks) a can of Acrylic Lacquer thinner, old rags, piece of cardboard, and a small container.
I tell people is to wash their car first. The reason for washing is that many times a blemish may be removed during the cleaning stage, thus you won't not need to touch it up.
Begin by taking some of the thinner and pour a small amount into a container. Shake your touch up paint well (most factory paint is thick).
Have your small piece of cardboard and an old rag next to you. Put about a dime size amount of paint on the cardboard, pick out a brush the correct size that will match the size of the chips you are working on.
The problem with the brush supplied with the paint is that it is large enough to paint your garage doors, NOT your chips. Always remember this, "less is best". You can avoid those unsightly "blobs" by using less paint.
Take your brush and put it in the thinner, dab dry. There will still be enough thinner in the brush to thin the paint. Apply the brush to the paint, moving it around. You will be thinning the paint just enough to make it easy to work with.
Now go to your chips and lightly touch them. *NOTE, the paint will dry fast on your brush; you might only get to one chip at first before the brush gets dried out and the paint gets stiff. Just simply start process over again, and move on to your next chip.
Once you get the hang of it, you might get 2-3 chips done before you need to thin again. After 24 hours, you have the option of putting a coat of clear on (nail polish works for this as well) which you can get at an auto supply store.
Some have told me that leaving it just with the paint works fine, without the clear. Try a hidden area with the clear first and see how it looks before you move on.
Well this certainly helps alot.
Thanks a bunch.
 

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Just FYI, I just recieved my touch up paint from Microfinish @ automotivetouchup.com and they matched the factory paint EXACTLY. Metallic and all. Very good product... also, the paint doesnt seem to be extremely thick either. Just thought I would pass that on.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That's great. I actually picked up a bottle at the dealer and it appears slightly lighter in color.
I found the ballpoint tip to be very useful in filling in the chip. Just push in the ball and it fills in nicely. Not perfect but better.
 

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thats exactly what i did with my car and it worked perfectly! i'm happy with the out come! but you can't really dodge the rocks so it seems like it's an on going process to touch up little rocks dings..
 

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Does anyone have any easy way to clean up a billet grille? its very time consuming and wondering if anyone had a few tips to make it easier.
 

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Here is some info that I have used...along with color sanding and PC & a mild polish to buff back to a shine if necessary...

Paint Chip Repair Made Easy
None of us can avoid those darn paint chips. They annoy us every time we wash our car when we see them. They also seem to grow in size and dimension every week.
Well, we can do something about it, short of a costly body shop visit. Here are some things you will need first: factory touchup paint, a pack of artist brushes (you can buy these at any craft store for under 5 bucks) a can of Acrylic Lacquer thinner, old rags, piece of cardboard, and a small container.
I tell people is to wash their car first. The reason for washing is that many times a blemish may be removed during the cleaning stage, thus you won't not need to touch it up.
Begin by taking some of the thinner and pour a small amount into a container. Shake your touch up paint well (most factory paint is thick).
Have your small piece of cardboard and an old rag next to you. Put about a dime size amount of paint on the cardboard, pick out a brush the correct size that will match the size of the chips you are working on.
The problem with the brush supplied with the paint is that it is large enough to paint your garage doors, NOT your chips. Always remember this, "less is best". You can avoid those unsightly "blobs" by using less paint.
Take your brush and put it in the thinner, dab dry. There will still be enough thinner in the brush to thin the paint. Apply the brush to the paint, moving it around. You will be thinning the paint just enough to make it easy to work with.
Now go to your chips and lightly touch them. *NOTE, the paint will dry fast on your brush; you might only get to one chip at first before the brush gets dried out and the paint gets stiff. Just simply start process over again, and move on to your next chip.
Once you get the hang of it, you might get 2-3 chips done before you need to thin again. After 24 hours, you have the option of putting a coat of clear on (nail polish works for this as well) which you can get at an auto supply store.
Some have told me that leaving it just with the paint works fine, without the clear. Try a hidden area with the clear first and see how it looks before you move on.
nice how-to. good info...
 
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